Forum Posts

Andrew S.
Mar 22, 2021
In General
I realized that in order to start publishing games on here we need to post under "Game Creation" and not "Games". While this does inherently make sense, I was wondering what the process was to actually get our games onto the "Games" board? Does it involve an approval process? Will it be something Pastel posts on our behalf? I don't expect my current game to be fully ready and published soon (as it still needs more playtesting), but I was wondering for the future.
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Andrew S.
Mar 07, 2021
In General
I decided to create this post for two reasons. First, I noticed the community here is quite...minimal, which is unfortunate, but I do hope that as NoGame gets more of a following that this community grows as well! Secondly, there was an interesting mental problem when creating my first Nogame game (should we just call them NoGames?) Put simply, it can be very difficult (at least for myself) to get out of the mindset of other card games, and regular playing cards! When I first sat down to create my first NoGame, I found myself constantly reffering to the cards as various "suits" and "ranks". Treating some cards (like the solid and split quantum cards) like there only functions were to be wild cards. I also found myself treating the sequence (one full harmonic scale) as set in stone, as if a new quadrant 1 card was always less than a new quadrant 3 card. Now, to be clear, it is not a bad thing to think of these cards similarly to regular playing cards. However, it can lead to unimaginative thinking and restricted creativity. NoGame cards are unique because there are so many different ways that cards can connect to each other. It's like learning the piano. Yes, the keys only go from low to high, and there are only black and white keys on varying scales. But there's so much more going on when you dig deeper. Various chords both minor and major open up a world of possible connections, each creating it's own unique sound and feel. In a similar way, NoGame cards specialize in having many various connections and sequences underneath the hood. Which, in itself, can lead to different card game ideas. I'm getting a little off topic, so let me get to my main point: how do you think like a NoGamer? First, separate yourself from what you know about regular playing cards. This first step is the most important, and the hardest to achieve. Note that you shouldn't forget about regular playing cards, but your knowledge and experience with them can hamper your creative process. Laying out the cards in front of you and focusing on the connections between them (phases, harmonies, quadrants, etc.) can help with this. Remember, NoGame cards are there own, unique beast. Treat it as such. Second, ask yourself the most basic of questions when designing. Instead of asking "Should this be a drawing game with draft mechanics?", ask a simple "When I pick up a card, what does that mean? What do I do with it?". This may seem redundant, but if done right, it can lead to creating systems completely unique to NoGame. Lastly, make sure you're having fun. Remember, if you don't enjoy playing your game, not many people will. This is more general design advice, but it holds true here. One of the best ways to create a fun game is to create situations where the player must decide between two or more options. "Should I play this card, or keep it in my hand?", "Should I take my chances, or play it safe?", "Do I trust this player or not?", "Where should I play this card?", "What card should I use?". Another good piece of design advice is to create situations where players will be forced to interact with other players. This is usually accomplished by having a shared deck and discard pile, but can also be done by having players interact with each other and the cards they have in their hand/pile, whether it be taking, trading, etc. To sum it up, in order to think like a NoGamer, you must: Seperate your mind from regular playing cards. Ask yourself the most basic design questions. Make sure your game is fun and interesting. I hope this post will help some budding designers out there. NoGame cards are really interesting and have the potential to become an industry standard, but they must first overcome the herculean task that is getting people to treat it as it's own, unique thing. Best of luck to everyone! Have fun creating and playing your own NoGames!
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Andrew S.
Mar 07, 2021
In Game Creation
So when I first played around with the NoGame cards, I decided to come up with a quick game idea. It still needs some refining, but I wanted to put it in here regardless. Hope you all enjoy! First off, this game is quite similar to Pastel's "Nomino" game. I will note I did not intentionally try to copy his original idea, and there are some unique differences. Although, I do believe we had the same idea for what a "beginner" game would look like to help you learn the sequence and the connections and terms associated with the cards (i.e. harmony, phase, quadrant, etc.) NOTE: The terminology used to describe cards in these instructions refers to the NoGame - Knowledge Base (NG-KB V1.00) Patch Notes: - Players now start the game with multiple cards already on the field - Players can now play as many cards as they want on a turn - There is now a hand limit of 6 - Players are dealt 5 cards instead of 6 - Clarified rules on passing turns - Added "Dissonant Chords": sets that have different harmonies, phases, and quadrants - Changed "Sets" to be "Chords" for thematic purposes - Clarified how to take multiple sets - Changed "Harmonic Quadrant" to "Quadrant Chord" for thematic purposes (only a name change) - Clarified rules regarding Transition and Quantum cards Object of the Game: To earn the most points by creating series of 3 or more cards, called “Chords”. The Deal and Setup: Each player receives 5 cards in their hand. The remaining cards (forming the main deck) is placed in the center of the table. A number of cards (equal to the amount of players, maximum of 4) are drawn and placed orthogonally on the sides of the deck. For two players, two cards are placed on opposite sides; and for four or more players, a card is placed on each side of the deck. All cards should have the same orientation. Empty Table/Hand: If at any point the playing area has no remaining cards, draw cards again as you would setting up the start of the game. Turn Order: Play starts with the player who suggested the idea of using NoGame cards (or whoever they decide should go first) and goes clockwise. Hand Limit: You may only have a maximum of 6 cards in your hand at any given time. On your turn: 1. Draw 1 card 2. Play cards on the table 3. Pick up any created Chords Each turn, you place cards down on the table next to any other available card in the playing area. This placement can be any orthogonal direction from the card (you may not place one card on top of another). You may place down as many cards as you are able. However, you may only place down a card if it connects to at least one other adjacent card (detailed in “creating chords”). At the end of your turn, any and all Chords you create are taken from the play area, one at a time, and put off to the side. Your turn is then passed to the next player. Passing and Drawing: If you are unable to play a card, you may draw one more card before ending your turn. If you do not want to play a card but are able to, you may still pass without drawing an extra card. If every player passes without playing a card, all players must shuffle their cards back into the deck and be dealt a new 5 cards. If you are unable to play a card and you have 6 cards in your hand, you may either pass without drawing, or shuffle your hand into the deck and draw a new 5 cards. Creating Chords: When 3 (or more) cards in the playing area are in a line and connect to each other, that creates a Chord. Which can then be picked up at the end of the turn. Cards that are considered to be “connected” to each other have the potential to be in a full Chord. A Chord can be created in 4 ways: a harmonic chord, a phase chord, a quadrant chord (aka harmonic quadrants), and a special dissonant chord. For reference - Harmonic Chord - Same harmony and phase, different quadrants. Phase Chord - Same phase and quadrant, different harmony. Quadrant Chord - Same harmony and quadrant, different phase. Dissonant Chord – Different harmony, different phase, different quadrant. Dissonant Chords: While the first three Chords can be found in the knowledge base, a dissonant chord is not. Put simply, every aspect of the card in the Chord must be different from each other. An example would be Low N1, Mid P2, High F3; or Mid F4, Low N3, High P1. Creating Chords larger than 3: As noted, it is possible to create Chords of more than 3 cards. However, if a Chord is created, it must be taken at the end of the turn, regardless of how many cards are in the Chord. Taking Chords: At the end of the turn, you must take any and all Chords you created. If there is a situation where one card is part of two different Chords, the player must choose one of the two. However, a player may take Chords in any order they wish, and does not have to be in the order they were created. Quantum and Transition cards: These cards are variations on the "wild" card. Each being able to connect different cards in the playing area. Transition cards - Connects 2 cards of any phase from indicated quadrants and harmony. Transition 1 cards connect any card of the same harmony to any card in quadrant 1 of that harmony. Solid - Connects any 2 cards of the indicated harmony. Split - Connects any card of 1 harmony to any card of another harmony, as indicated on the card. Double back - Connects any 2 cards. Note: Quantum and Transition cards, while still able to be in any position in a Chord, cannot connect with each other, and can only connect to phase cards. The one exception being the double back card, which can connect any two cards. End of the Game: The game ends when the deck runs out of cards, and no player can play any cards, or every player passes. Once the game ends, count up how many points each player has, and whoever has the highest amount of points wins! Tip: Whenever the deck runs out of cards, a new spot for putting cards opens up where the deck was. Use this to create surprise Chords!
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Andrew S.
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